Rolling Forecast

Rolling Forecast – Case Study: A Review Of Management

By: Richard Reinderhoff, Freelance Consultant Strategy & Operations​

A rolling forecast is not only about seeing the future unravel, but a constant evaluation of the management team to see if they are able to adjust their operations on time. Without it, any form of strategic planning becomes useless. Below you find a real-life case. Step-by-step each question will be briefly discussed. It is about a foreign business unit, which was part of a large European corporation, on the brink of a crisis.

FP&A: the Evolution of Driver-Based Planning

By Larysa Melnychuk and  Hans Gobin 

Driver-based planning (DBP) is an essential part of the financial planning and analysis (FP&A) armoury, enabling organisations – ranging from the smallest non-profit to a multinational – to become quicker, more dynamic and agile in their planning and in responding to internal and external changes in the business environment.
DBP was the focus on the London FP&A Board of senior practitioners’ most recent meeting, sponsored by Michael Page and Metapraxis, which was held on the eve of the landmark UK referendum on its continued membership of the European Union (EU). Given that the result early on June 24 confounded many expectations, the benefits of DBP may have been evident to many companies forced to reassess both their short-term and longer-term business plans.

This article outlines the main conclusions and recommendations on DBP that were generated by the London FP&A Board.

Three Stages of Rolling Forecast Maturity

By Larysa Melnychuk, Managing Director at FP&A Trends group

Rolling Forecasts  are an essential tool for financial planning and analysis (FP&A), with a potential to radically transform corporates’ traditional budgeting process.
The London FP&A Board of senior practitioners’ most recent meeting focused on why Rolling Forecasts  are ideal for financial planning and analysis (FP&A) professionals. It also discussed best practice and the ‘Three Stages of Rolling Forecast Maturity’ model, summarised in this article.

The latest meeting was again jointly sponsored by Metapraxis, the consultancy, analytics for financial professionals and software provider and Michael Page, the global specialist recruitment firm.

London FP&A Board: Rolling Forecast – The Maersk Group Case Study

By Neil Ainger, published first at GTNews

The financial planning and analysis (FP&A Board) Board of senior practitioners recently met in London, UK, to discuss the pros and cons of rolling forecasts, how best to introduce it, and to hear a case study from Maersk Group about how the shipping, transport, and oil firm has benefitted.

“We’ve abolished the annual budget completely and only use rolling forecasting (RF) now,” said Matthijs Schot, head of performance & analysis at AP Moller Maersk, as he shared his company’s implementation four years ago of an RF process and the lessons they’ve learnt.

Speaking to the 20 members of the financial planning and analysis (FP&A) Board gathered at the Holborn, central London offices of the sponsor Michael Page Finance on 18 May, with the other sponsor Metapraxis also in attendance, Schot added that: “Maersk is a very asset-heavy company so has a strong need for forecasting”. After all, it takes a lot to build a huge cargo vessel or oil terminal so effective predictions of costs, future revenues and market movements are essential.

Best practices in Rolling Forecasts

By Elena Kiristova, CFO Russia and CIS at Groupon

Everyone wants a crystal ball to be able to peer into the future. For businesses, that desire becomes a necessity because having a vision of the future allows for better and more strategic decision-making in the present.

A rolling forecast simply means that each quarter or month, a company projects four to six quarters or twelve to eighteen months ahead.

This allows executives and key decision makers to see both a financial and operational vision of the future. It also helps them assess next steps in their execution of their plan, understand critical pivot points in the plan and better judge the impact the economy may have on their plan.

I have seen rolling forecasts replace annual planning cycles with a continual planning process that results in more regular business reviews that look to the future. These reviews enable managers to understand problems, challenges and trends sooner and improve their proactive approach to those problems, challenges and trends.

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